ADS-B Traffic Quiz: How does it work?

1 min read

The FAA has managed to make the traffic component of ADS-B both easy and hard. There’s a new set of acronyms, like UAT, TIS-B, 1090ES, ADS-B Out, ADS-R, FIS-B, but do they really matter at the end of the day? The short answer is yes and you should know what they mean, but the good news is once you’re properly equipped and up in the air, the system “just works” and will provide a complete traffic picture on your iPad or panel in most parts of the U.S.

Portable ADS-B receivers for the iPad, like Sentry, have made traffic in the cockpit accessible to all pilots flying any type of aircraft. Take our latest quiz to learn more about ADS-B traffic nuances, so you’ll be confident in knowing when you’re receiving a complete traffic picture on your iPad, and when you’re not.

 

1. As part of the FAA's NextGen ADS-B air traffic system, what is the service that provides the altitude, ground track, speed and distance of aircraft flying in radar contact to other aircraft equipped with ADS-B Out transponders?
1. As part of the FAA's NextGen ADS-B air traffic system, what is the service that provides the altitude, ground track, speed and distance of aircraft flying in radar contact to other aircraft equipped with ADS-B Out transponders?
Correct! Wrong!
2. In order to receive a custom traffic data package from the ADS-B network of ground stations, you must first do what?
2. In order to receive a custom traffic data package from the ADS-B network of ground stations, you must first do what?
Correct! Wrong!
3. If you are not ADS-B Out equipped but flying near another aircraft that is, then you will see all Mode C traffic.
3. If you are not ADS-B Out equipped but flying near another aircraft that is, then you will see all Mode C traffic.
Correct! Wrong!
4. What is the update rate for TIS-B traffic sent to your ADS-B equipped airplane from ADS-B ground towers?
4. What is the update rate for TIS-B traffic sent to your ADS-B equipped airplane from ADS-B ground towers?
Correct! Wrong!
5. When flying with ForeFlight, what is the significance of a potential traffic conflict depicted in red?
5. When flying with ForeFlight, what is the significance of a potential traffic conflict depicted in red?
Correct! Wrong!
6. What size is the traffic "hockey puck" that ground stations transmit to participating ADS-B out equipped aircraft?
6. What size is the traffic
Correct! Wrong!
7. How should you maneuver your airplane when receiving a traffic alert for another airplane at your altitude, without having the other airplane in sight?
7. How should you maneuver your airplane when receiving a traffic alert for another airplane at your altitude, without having the other airplane in sight?
Correct! Wrong!

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Flying with ADS-B Traffic You got out of 7 right!
6 replies
  1. CJN
    CJN says:

    Question 7. If I didn’t react to an Traffic proximity alert and begin simultaneous evasive maneuvers….I probably wouldn’t be able to respond to this quiz.

    Reply
  2. John Saviano
    John Saviano says:

    Not sure I agree with #7. I once saw an aircraft on ADS-B at the same altitude and heading directly in my direction. Before I visually saw the plane, I had changed altitude. Then the plane flew very close to where I would have been.

    Reply
  3. Craig Van Matre
    Craig Van Matre says:

    The question is misleading because it does not limit the hypothetical situation to IFR flight; nor does it detail how much of a deviation would be required in order to avoid merging your aircraft’s depiction on the TIS-B display with the target aircraft’s. I’m sure the avionics manufacturers don’t want to warrant that a pilot can rely exclusively on the display and can ignore their “see and avoid” obligation during VFR conditions, but waiting to actually see a merging aircraft might be too little, too late. I fly in the Denver area, and routinely deviate for traffic conflicts my displays show as problematic until I can actually see the target. IFR deviations ought to be explained to the controller monitoring the flight–after the fact, but it’s easy to miss nearby traffic in hazy but nevertheless VFR conditions. Accordingly selecting a different answer other than the suggested answer to this question should not be a cause for embarrassment.

    Reply

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