Apple announced their much-anticipated smartwatch today, which will pair up with your iPhone to display messages and allow you to interact with apps right from your wrist. There is a lot of potential with this product given the large number of app developers in the aviation community and amount of pilots currently flying with iPhones and iPads.

While Apple released a good deal of information on the new device at their press event, you won’t be able to actually buy one until next year. And as of now Apple says it’ll only work with your iPhone, though it seems only logical that it’ll work with the iPad eventually. But for now we’re curious–would you buy one, and how would you see yourself using it in the airplane?

[polldaddy poll=”8296943″]

10 replies
  1. Launchpad Marzari
    Launchpad Marzari says:

    What if Apple watch were able to monitor oxygen in the bloodstream to prevent hypoxia by alarming the user via the Bluetooth in your ANR headset and send an alarm to be displayed somewhere in the avionics suite via Wi-Fi. If Apple watch is doing heartbeat via infrared it seems to me possible that it could be checking oxygen in the bloodstream just like the finger gizmo does.

  2. Steve Reisser
    Steve Reisser says:

    This is a new processor that will not work with existing apps like Foreflight. App must be rewritten to fit the new architecture. Some apps will be developed but don’t expect to download your favorite iPhone and iPad apps. Still a very cool piece of technology, but aviation apps won’t be immediately availabe.

  3. Shane Woodson
    Shane Woodson says:

    iFly GPS was just discussing the Apple Watch to create an algorithm to monitor and alert for hypoxia using it’s sensors. Also to use a combination of the Taptic engine and small screen to alert of Nav commands or Alerts for Airspace, Traffic, etc.

    We as developers should use this to help fellow pilots get their eyes off the screens and looking outside the plane again. Our code saw is handled differently than Native iOS apps, so we have an opportunity to bring this to market without a total rewrite.

  4. M
    M says:

    1.) Timely airspace entry alert (Class B, C, D). Projected flight path, altitude, etc.

    2.) Special Flight Rules.

    3.) TFRs, PIREPS, etc.

  5. MacManPilot
    MacManPilot says:

    I would love for it to pick up my acceleration so that it could log my flight time in LogTen, pick up my locations as well. Even if I was able to just do a start and stop times so that it would not require me to go through my phone. Put in the rest of the data later. That would be nice

  6. RON-NAPPER
    RON-NAPPER says:

    BASIC SIX PACK IN I.F.R. WITCH SHOULD BE TOUGHT BEFORE INTERING A PILOT PROGRAM WHEN I STARTED FLYING I WHEN ON A DEMO FLIGHT WITCH I WHERE WISHING OH SPORTY PILOT TO PAY FOR ABOUT TWENTY HOURS OR MORE AFTER SIX HOURS FLIGHT TIME SOME OF MY INSTRUCTERS USED O.B.S AND A/P WITCH FIXED ALL TRIM SO I ALSO HAVE DONE SOME SKY DIVEN IN EMERGENCE BELL OUT MOST AIR CRAFT HAVE PARASHOOTS DO NOT USE OVE CONSTUTIONAL WATER OR PRIMTER BOUNDRY.

  7. Fabio Ospino
    Fabio Ospino says:

    It seems technology goes faster that we can anticipate. I am very excited about these new breakouts; however, I will be very cautious about implementing these in the cockpit. For instance the D2 from Garmin is quite good as a back up tool and not as a primary device.
    At this point, a trial an error approach will be more suitable for the cockpit!!

  8. R. Miller
    R. Miller says:

    I am just starting to fly. What a dream come true!! I know my eyes should be outside looking for so much more than inside the plane but it’s not easy to do. Don’t know if this could help a student pilot or not, but sounds like it may become very helpful later on.

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